Tag Archives: glass

Grab Your Gear

Three big and beautiful industrial gears got my wheels turning.

I knew the largest one, 17.5 inches in diameter, would become the top of a coffee table. Geared up for this big idea, I commandeered the base from an old industrial stool …

… and spray painted what would become the coffee table legs.

It looked a little boring so I broke out the Rub ‘n Buff wax, rubbing on patches of bronze and black.

The next problem was finding a way to secure the gear to the base. For this, I anxiously awaited the next meet-up of the Long Island Makerspace. It’s a group of people who, well, like to make stuff. We meet in a small industrial plant with access to, among other goodies, a 130 watt CO2 Laser Cutter.

Oh, I was itching for my turn with that baby! As a novice, circles seemed like a good start. 

With a little help, I programed the laser to cut a few perfectly perfect circles from a melamine panel.

The result:

No, I wouldn’t be rounding up all of these disks for my gear table. I just needed the six “doughnuts” I’d cut. I frosted them with wood glue and stacked them up like a layer cake.

When dry, the glued layers received the same paint and wax treatment as the base.

Four existing holes in the base made an easy job of screwing the base to the melamine from underneath.

Not only would this laser-cut-layer-cake pull the base and the gear together, it would add a few needed inches to the height of the table. 

The rough feet of the base needed rubber tips. I had to cut them with a utility knife to make them fit. Not beautiful, but they did the job.

Four screws with washers, camouflaged with a repeat application of paint and wax, secured the gear to the top.

In anticipation of the final step, I pressed eight self-adhesive plastic “buttons” around the rim.

There wasn’t a structural purpose for a center-hole design, but I liked how it looked.

For a little more bling, I iced the gear tips with Rub ‘n Buff bronze.

The final step will be a glass top, 24″ inches in diameter, that I’ll purchase from the local glass shop I used in I Can Top That. (I’ll post the real final result soon. I was too excited wait.)

All in all, a piece of cake!

www.karenraelevine.com

I Can Top That

Thrift store. Ten dollars. Need I say more?

First it got a good cleaning.

Then I took the top off…

and popped out the particle board insert. It took a little elbow grease to scrape off some of the glue it left behind.

I painted just the table top and the ball feet with Provence, and the rest with 1:1 mixture of Annie Sloan Duck Egg Blue and Provence. I tried Old White on the insert but decided to toss it all altogether. I had an idea for that gaping hole in the table top.

But first the wax. As usual, every surface got a coat of clear.  I wanted to highlight the details with dark wax but didn’t want the stark streaks it often produced. ***Before I brushed on the dark wax, I directed a hair dryer on the can, which gave me a little puddle of melted wax in the middle.***  DO NOT DO THIS! THE WAX IS FLAMMIBLE!!!

Brushing on a warmer, wetter wax helped provided a smoother effect. You can see my progress in the photo below. All but the leg on the right have a coat of dark.

Notice that I didn’t screw the top back on the base. I reimagined the tabletop as a removable tray.

I bought two of these handles on Ebay from a seller who had six of them. (I loved them so much, I went back on Ebay and ordered the remaining four, for future projects.)

Now to take care of that big hole in the tabletop:

I took the top to Cooper’s Glass and Mirror, and for forty dollars, the enthusiastic owner of the local shop had the glass cut and siliconed inside the grove. He even had it ready for me the same day! More often than not, artisans are happy, and sometimes even excited, to be a part of the creative process.

I glued felt pads (normally used for chair feet) to the bottom corners of the tray. These keep the tray from slipping around on the legs and it also protects the surfaces wherever else the tray might rest.

I love the subtle difference in the two paint colors and I also love the functionality of this table.

Imagine bringing drinks or snacks from the kitchen and having a handy place to rest the tray. Even if the tray stays put, it’s a pretty great side table. It’s hard to top that!

www.karenraelevine.com